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@  CC. : (29 August 2013 - 05:20 AM) I agree Morey is referring to D12 and the new bench cast. But still, I can't picture teammates as a birthday 'gift'. Sounds a little inhuman too. It's like Morey said 'here I got you new friends for your birthday because you weren't satisfied with buddy Delfino'. Teammates are people not material gifts aren't they? Haahaha. It just sounds off to me
@  ale11 : (28 August 2013 - 06:35 PM) It would be pretty morbid to tell Lin via twitter that he is gonna get traded that way...looking at it positively, it meant "I got you DH12 and a bunch of shooters, go nuts with the PnR and show your worth".
@  Rahat Huq : (28 August 2013 - 11:20 AM) pretty sure he meant the new guys we've already acquired
@  CC. : (28 August 2013 - 03:00 AM) In Morey's birthday tweet to J.Lin...he mentioned Lin getting 'new teammates'...are these teammates in a Rocket uniform? Or are they new 'new' teammates? This might get some hopes up for the guys wanting Lin out
@  timetodienow... : (20 August 2013 - 01:15 AM) Good insight, ST.
@  Sir Thursday : (19 August 2013 - 10:12 PM) On a radio show or TV interview you have a lot less time to police yourself. In a forum like an AMA, Morey has much more time to decide what responses are OK and doesn't have to be so guarded. That's my hypothesis, anyway.
@  timetodienow... : (18 August 2013 - 09:42 PM) I can see that. He's always very circumspect when he's talking on camera compared to doing these AMAs. I don't think he's uncomfortable speaking but he's more in his element chatting online.
@  feelingsuper... : (18 August 2013 - 04:23 PM) I think you're on to something timetodie but I wouldn't say he is uncomfortable speaking, we just gleam more insight from what he writes.
@  timetodienow... : (16 August 2013 - 10:35 PM) Has anyone noticed that Morey is more comfortable typing than speaking?
@  2016Champions : (16 August 2013 - 08:53 PM) Daryl Morey's reddit AMA today: http://www.reddit.co...eason_addition/
@  Sir Thursday : (16 August 2013 - 06:54 PM) (Although having said that, Cleveland and Washington being improved mean that there might actually be some competition towards the bottom of the Eastern Conference playoff bracket for once).
@  Sir Thursday : (16 August 2013 - 06:53 PM) They may end up with the 8th seed again this year, but they'll be a team on the up rather than a team that's reached its peak.
@  Sir Thursday : (16 August 2013 - 06:52 PM) That's a lot of shooting, anyhow. And they've filled the bench with serviceable players, too.
@  Sir Thursday : (16 August 2013 - 06:49 PM) (or maybe you put Gary Neal in for Delfino)
@  Sir Thursday : (16 August 2013 - 06:48 PM) It's not a roster completely devoid of talent, anyway. Knight/Mayo/Delfino/Ilyasova/Sanders seems like a reasonable starting lineup.
@  Sir Thursday : (16 August 2013 - 06:45 PM) A lot depends on if they can develop their young guys. Knight, Henson, Antetokounmpo...
@  timetodienow... : (16 August 2013 - 06:41 PM) Although this signing does make them look better to me.
@  timetodienow... : (16 August 2013 - 06:40 PM) Maybe. I don't really care all that much, but it just seems like he's being underpaid. And why would he want to stay in MIL? Have you seen the moves they've made thus far.
@  Sir Thursday : (16 August 2013 - 06:36 PM) A player with 7 years' experience qualifies for a bigger max contract, right? Maybe he's angling for that
@  timetodienow... : (16 August 2013 - 06:33 PM) I hope he has an ETO. That would make the deal make sense in my mind. Otherwise why not play next year and get offered the max by a desperate team and have MIL match?

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Does anybody hold athletes to a higher standard since they're supposed to be "role models"?


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#1 timetodienow1234567

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 09:43 PM

I was just wondering because ST brought this up with the doping argument. I would just like to know people's opinions. 

 

Here are some examples of what role models these players are,

 

Kobe Bryant was accused of raping a young woman(until he settled).

Terrence Jones allegedly stomped a homeless man.

James Harden pays his girlfriend 50k a month.

KG told Melo that his wife Lala tastes like honey nut cheerios.

Andrew Bynum clotheslined a guy more than a foot shorter.

Ron Artest and the Malice in the Palace.

....and so on and so on.

 

Further back you can look at Barkley and Jordan, among others who are not role models. So I think that anybody who holds NBA players to a role model standard is foolish. 

 

I admit that I would like players to be better people, I just view them as people. I don't hold them to a higher standard. I don't have kids, and maybe my opinion will change when I do. I just think the onus is on the parents to raise their kids not sit them in front of a tv and let the television raise their kids.

 

That's just off the top of my head. I brought in a few Rockets players to make this post more relevant. 


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Why so Serious? :D


#2 rockets best fan

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 10:25 PM

@TTDN

I agree allowing your kids to idolize players is short sighted and shifting responsibility. It's the parents job to instill what is right and wrong in a child's life. I have raised three children of my own and never allowed them to put anyone on a pedestal outside of GOD. I taught them that we are all human and therefore creatures of fault. to teach kids anything else is setting them up for a fall later in life.


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#3 Cooper

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    Posted 26 August 2013 - 10:45 PM

    No, obviously you'd like people that have a bigger stage or could impact younger people to be generally good people but at the end of the day there will be disapointments even with the best people.
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    #4 rockets best fan

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    Posted 26 August 2013 - 11:14 PM

    now having got my first statement out of the way let me say this. as much as I wished all parents saw the importance of guiding their children like I did.....the reality is some parents don't. these professional ball players do provide some level of role model to these kids. that's sad to say, but true. so YES I do want these ball players to hold to a higher standard. they are visible to these kids and can influence many. if you don't think they do just look at some of the latest fads among kids now and how they try to emulate what they see these players do.


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    #5 BrentYen

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    Posted 26 August 2013 - 11:20 PM

    The question was "are they supposed to be role models?". I think, yes, they are supposed to be. What all of you said are not wrong. Just saying when you have a bugger impact on  society, the higher standard on you is basically inherently applied, hence you should be more careful on a lot of your behavior.


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    #6 rockets best fan

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    Posted 27 August 2013 - 02:20 AM

    The question was "are they supposed to be role models?". I think, yes, they are supposed to be. What all of you said are not wrong. Just saying when you have a bugger impact on  society, the higher standard on you is basically inherently applied, hence you should be more careful on a lot of your behavior.

    to the question.....are they suppose to be role models? I think NO. kids should see role models in other places in their lives. if they have no choice but to look up to prima donna overpaid crybaby's for moral guidance then what does that say about the state of the family in America? while I believe these players shouldn't have to be role models.....it's a sad fact they are and because of that and that alone I hold them to higher standards.


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    #7 BrentYen

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    Posted 27 August 2013 - 04:14 AM

    to the question.....are they suppose to be role models? I think NO. kids should see role models in other places in their lives. if they have no choice but to look up to prima donna overpaid crybaby's for moral guidance then what does that say about the state of the family in America? while I believe these players shouldn't have to be role models.....it's a sad fact they are and because of that and that alone I hold them to higher standards.

    Hmn...I think what you say make sense too.


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    #8 thejohnnygold

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    Posted 27 August 2013 - 04:01 PM

    My father is a man I looked up to my whole life--and continue to do so.  He provided a role model for me that would make Gerald Ford feel inadequate.

     

    However, as a young teenager I still sought out others to emulate.  My father could not throw a football 60 yards and hit Haywood Jeffries or Ernest Givens for a touchdown.  My father couldn't dunk a basketball and he couldn't hit home runs either.  Sports were a big part of my life and it was inevitable that I had my "heroes".  These athletes will be looked up to no matter how much parenting is involved....

     

    ....and this is where it comes back to parenting.  As my heroes fell one by one, (as nearly all of them did) I went to my father and he talked to me about it.  I learned many valuable lessons vicariously through my "heroes".  The media that had built them up and placed them on a throne was the same media that tore the flesh from their bones.  For myself, I learned the folly of putting people on pedestals as well as our shared humanity.

     

    While it is right to trust in good parenting (what other choice do we have, really?) it is also wise to not tempt youth with decisions they are not equipped to properly weigh.  Children are prone to trusting and I can easily imagine a scenario where a self-serving coach abuses that trust and convinces kids to take PED's because he says, "It's ok".

     

    In short, athletes should not be role models.  That is not the world we live in though.  The facade of higher standards implemented by their employers only serves to make the whole thing seem insincere when the bubble bursts.  The people who do good for the world don't sell newspapers, advertisements, or anything for that matter.  The difference between the way the world should be and the way it is causes the disconnect.  Athletes should not have this thrust upon their shoulders (although it should be noted many athletes are great role models both on and off their respective courts).  Parents cannot 100% police their children's influences, but they can provide good ones to balance it all out.  There's my 2 cents.


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    #9 rockets best fan

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    Posted 27 August 2013 - 04:44 PM

    @JG

    I agree with what you laying down. I think we are on the same page here, but you said it much better than me. the final responsibility is on the parent.....problem is the parent is absent as a guiding force in many of these homes leaving no one to separate the lessens like your father did for you and mine did for me. I agree there are some who do emulate good role models. but usually they don't get the attention. normally it's the bad actors.


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    #10 thejohnnygold

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    Posted 27 August 2013 - 05:06 PM

    Exactly.  Personally (and by personally I mean selfishly), I think PED's should be 100% legal.  There is nothing I would like better than a league full of juiced up, roided out, HGH-enhanced, Bane-like monster athletes doing things no other human could possibly do just to amuse me.

     

    The other side of me recognizes the costs of such a thing and realizes this is a terrible, terrible idea across the board.  I think the only effective solution is life-time bans that include full salary forfeiture.  Real penalties.  If you want squeaky clean guys and squeaky clean leagues this is the only way.  I'd even go so far as to open a "Hall of Shame" and use it as motivation for youngsters to see what happens when you don't act right and how much there is to lose.


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    #11 rockets best fan

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    Posted 27 August 2013 - 05:23 PM

    Exactly.  Personally (and by personally I mean selfishly), I think PED's should be 100% legal.  There is nothing I would like better than a league full of juiced up, roided out, HGH-enhanced, Bane-like monster athletes doing things no other human could possibly do just to amuse me.

     

    The other side of me recognizes the costs of such a thing and realizes this is a terrible, terrible idea across the board.  I think the only effective solution is life-time bans that include full salary forfeiture.  Real penalties.  If you want squeaky clean guys and squeaky clean leagues this is the only way.  I'd even go so far as to open a "Hall of Shame" and use it as motivation for youngsters to see what happens when you don't act right and how much there is to lose.

    I agree there should be real penalties, but considering how easy it is for one of these players to take something without really knowing what's in it that you have to be reserve in the penalties. just take a look at the local GNC store. is so easy to think you are taking something safe and it actually has some of these forbidden substances within it's makeup.


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    #12 Cooper

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      Posted 27 August 2013 - 05:42 PM

      I agree there should be real penalties, but considering how easy it is for one of these players to take something without really knowing what's in it that you have to be reserve in the penalties. just take a look at the local GNC store. is so easy to think you are taking something safe and it actually has some of these forbidden substances within it's makeup.

      Some of the other lesser peds/banned substances you could say maybe they accidentally took it. Still should pay attention or pay someone to pay attention to it for you. And you definitly can't say oh whoops there was HGH or testoserone in my protien bars or whatever.
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      #13 CC.

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      Posted 28 August 2013 - 02:01 AM

      My father is a man I looked up to my whole life--and continue to do so.  He provided a role model for me that would make Gerald Ford feel inadequate.

       

      However, as a young teenager I still sought out others to emulate.  My father could not throw a football 60 yards and hit Haywood Jeffries or Ernest Givens for a touchdown.  My father couldn't dunk a basketball and he couldn't hit home runs either.  Sports were a big part of my life and it was inevitable that I had my "heroes".  These athletes will be looked up to no matter how much parenting is involved....

       

      ....and this is where it comes back to parenting.  As my heroes fell one by one, (as nearly all of them did) I went to my father and he talked to me about it.  I learned many valuable lessons vicariously through my "heroes".  The media that had built them up and placed them on a throne was the same media that tore the flesh from their bones.  For myself, I learned the folly of putting people on pedestals as well as our shared humanity.

       

      While it is right to trust in good parenting (what other choice do we have, really?) it is also wise to not tempt youth with decisions they are not equipped to properly weigh.  Children are prone to trusting and I can easily imagine a scenario where a self-serving coach abuses that trust and convinces kids to take PED's because he says, "It's ok".

       

      In short, athletes should not be role models.  That is not the world we live in though.  The facade of higher standards implemented by their employers only serves to make the whole thing seem insincere when the bubble bursts.  The people who do good for the world don't sell newspapers, advertisements, or anything for that matter.  The difference between the way the world should be and the way it is causes the disconnect.  Athletes should not have this thrust upon their shoulders (although it should be noted many athletes are great role models both on and off their respective courts).  Parents cannot 100% police their children's influences, but they can provide good ones to balance it all out.  There's my 2 cents.

      I enjoyed reading that, thejohnnygold


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      #14 Alituro

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        Posted 28 August 2013 - 08:20 PM

        My father is a man I looked up to my whole life--and continue to do so.  He provided a role model for me that would make Gerald Ford feel inadequate.

         

        However, as a young teenager I still sought out others to emulate.  My father could not throw a football 60 yards and hit Haywood Jeffries or Ernest Givens for a touchdown.  My father couldn't dunk a basketball and he couldn't hit home runs either.  Sports were a big part of my life and it was inevitable that I had my "heroes".  These athletes will be looked up to no matter how much parenting is involved....

         

        ....and this is where it comes back to parenting.  As my heroes fell one by one, (as nearly all of them did) I went to my father and he talked to me about it.  I learned many valuable lessons vicariously through my "heroes".  The media that had built them up and placed them on a throne was the same media that tore the flesh from their bones.  For myself, I learned the folly of putting people on pedestals as well as our shared humanity.

         

        While it is right to trust in good parenting (what other choice do we have, really?) it is also wise to not tempt youth with decisions they are not equipped to properly weigh.  Children are prone to trusting and I can easily imagine a scenario where a self-serving coach abuses that trust and convinces kids to take PED's because he says, "It's ok".

         

        In short, athletes should not be role models.  That is not the world we live in though.  The facade of higher standards implemented by their employers only serves to make the whole thing seem insincere when the bubble bursts.  The people who do good for the world don't sell newspapers, advertisements, or anything for that matter.  The difference between the way the world should be and the way it is causes the disconnect.  Athletes should not have this thrust upon their shoulders (although it should be noted many athletes are great role models both on and off their respective courts).  Parents cannot 100% police their children's influences, but they can provide good ones to balance it all out.  There's my 2 cents.

        My vote for post of the year.

         

        I agree, as a father of 4 (ages 2mo. to 17 years), that whether we like it or not, pro athletes are role models for our children. I happen to like it that they are role models, much more so than say a politician, doctor, lawyer or actor. Reason is that they epitomize the idea that if you enjoy your work, it's not really working at all. But, in order to be able to earn a living doing the one thing you love most, it takes sacrifice and years and years of hard work. Nobody in the league, (short of Jordan Hill) became NBA players because they woke up one morning in their adult lives and said "hmmmmm... I think I'm going to play professional ball"... nobody. They all got where they are through a lifetime of practice and hard work. Nothing gets handed to you. Children find it hard to look at other glamorous professions in the same way, because they can't relate to the particular job in a real world fashion, be it doctor, lawyer, politician, or actor. Most kids can relate to throwing a football or shooting a basketball, so it gives them a tangible frame of reference for their idolization. Musicians are much the same because kids have banged on pianos or drums, strummed guitars and realize that making music isn't as simple as they make it seem. 

         

        Putting people on pedestals and having role models are two different things altogether. When a less-than-wholesome act is committed by these role models, it's important to communicate to your kids that they are simply humans going to work. They make the same mistakes in life as you or I. It's also important that you hammer home the idea that these are public figures with millions watching them, so when they do something wrong, the whole world knows about it. That's the media doing it's job, trying to sensationalize as much as possible to attract more viewers. Again, more humans going to work.

         

        Is it too much to ask that all 450 players on NBA rosters be perfect choir boys? Yes. There is no profession or organization that can boast 100% character excellence. However, most, if not all NBA players and players with most pro sports are active, positively in their communities. These are the values, as parents, that need to be highlighted to our children.


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        #15 BrentYen

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        Posted 28 August 2013 - 09:01 PM

        My vote for post of the year.

         

        ........................................

         

        Is it too much to ask that all 450 players on NBA rosters be perfect choir boys? Yes. There is no profession or organization that can boast 100% character excellence. However, most, if not all NBA players and players with most pro sports are active, positively in their communities. These are the values, as parents, that need to be highlighted to our children.

        I don think been a role model means been perfect. They just need to be more careful on what hey do or say. They impact the society so much that I think they should be held by the society with higher standard. In fact, not every Kids got parents to guide them. The role models can be even more positive on those cases.


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