What’s the Worst that Could Happen?

The Houston Rockets have had a very, very good summer. The young nucleus of James Harden, Jeremy Lin, Chandler Parsons and Ömer Aşık is another year older and more experienced. Some nice, solid signings filled out a bench that was less about skill and more about potential last season. Oh, and a center named Dwight Howard chose to sign with Houston. The Rockets look poised to make some major waves this season, but there’s always the chance it won’t pan out. What’s the worst that could happen this year?

Later this week we’ll look at what the best case scenario might be, but it’s always best to look at the bad news first. And the bad news might not be so bad, anyway. After all, what really is the worst that could happen? Well, that depends on some ground rules. Obviously some sort of worldwide apocalypse would be worse for the team than a poor season, but that’s not what we’re looking for. So we’re not looking for anything affecting basketball from the outside world, like car accidents, floods, meteors, assassinations, etc. This is purely about what the Rockets might reasonably do that could hinder their season, and what that season could look like.

So, what could the Rockets do that would harm their season? There’s a pretty big elephant in the room, and it’s hanging all over Dwight Howard. There are myriad reasons for circumspection about his performance this season. The first and most convincing reason is his play from last year. He posted his worst numbers since 2006, whether you measure by game or per 36 minutes. His scoring, rebounding and turnovers were all worse than his previous six seasons, something which is troubling for a player in his prime. Circumstances may have been extenuating in Los Angeles, but that does little to console the cynic. His back and shoulder injuries obviously bothered him, but those don’t instantly disappear upon moving to Houston. There’s good reason to believe he’ll be healthier, but nobody’s sure when or if Dwight will hit one hundred percent health again. If the issue was lack of motivation, one might hope that a change in scenery can change his demeanor. In that case, the very realistic worry is that a player who lacks motivation in one scenario is likely to lack it in others as well. Howard’s alleged dissatisfaction last year was hardly an isolated season.

If Dwight is disappointing, there’s the possibility for his backup, Ömer Aşık, to be an active detriment. Aşık reportedly asked for a trade nearly immediately after Dwight Howard announced his intention to move to Houston. While the trade rumors seem to have largely cooled off, we have yet to hear, much less see, Ömer Aşik show enthusiasm to play off the bench or alongside Howard. A few noncommittal comments to Turkish media aside, the center from Asia Minor has the potential to derail a large part of general manager Daryl Morey’s plan. Aşık has shown himself to be a hard worker, and is unlikely to consciously give less than his full effort. The worry is that he might do it unconsciously. A bad work situation and mental situation is liable to affect anyone’s mood, and if Aşık is openly disgruntled, it’ll show in his play whether he means it to or not. The rug was pulled out from under him quite badly, and he could force his way out by the trade deadline.

In fact, the sooner Aşık is traded, the better. Morey rarely moves on anything than what he feels is the best possible deal. In that case, a trade well before the February 20th trade deadline would have to be very favorable for Houston. A trade at the deadline, however, might very well be a resignation to bringing back a poor haul for a player destroying his own trade value. The chemistry which worked so well last season would already have been degraded by that point, with a roster shakeup doing little to help. If both centers have poor years, it could prove to be a waking nightmare for Daryl Morey.

Unfortunately, the wings are not by any means guaranteed to make Morey’s life easier. After a lack of a sophomore slump, Chandler Parsons picked up a fair degree of buzz around the league, and has even begun to enter conversations about top ten small forwards and future all-star potential. There may be some pie in that sky, but it’s much more likely that there’s just more of last season. Most of these discussions hinge around the idea that Parsons is still improving, and if he does so at the rate he improved in his first two years, the sky’s the limit. The problem is that there’s no reason to believe that. He played four years in college, a distinction that actually hurts his chances of improvement. Older rookies and sophomores are often closer to the player they’ll be long term, and are if nothing else a bit older, with less upside left. He was also more convincing on defense in his rookie year in the NBA, which implies that a big difference was a change in where he focused his effort. His breakdown and reconstruction of his shot did improve his game, however, and has shown himself to be a hard worker. Parsons may not improve much more, despite the hype he’s accrued this year, but that’s just fine.

The bigger concern is James Harden. While Harden is clearly at or near the top of the list at his position, there are reasons for concern. One common worry for teams with two superstars is that of primacy. Harden and Howard both wanted to play alongside one another, but will they keep wanting to once the reality sets in? This line of thinking continues to have traction, though in practice it seems to seldom cause much friction. The more valid concern is not if they want to play together, but rather how they play together. Howard has made some noises about being pleased to play in a pick and roll offense, but made many more noises to the contrary last year. Harden is a scorer, plain and simple, and if Howard is unwilling or unable to facilitate that the majority of the time, some real problems will crop up. Having Harden or the point guard pass the ball into the post can be a rest for the ball handlers when used correctly, or a waste of talent when used too much. Houston has excellent pick and roll ball handlers, and not going to that threat often would be a fast way for their offense to stagnate. The Rockets also need to keep Harden out of the habit of jacking up threes and into the habit of using a solid pick to find a shot, something which was a concern last year as well. His attempted daggers are amazing when they hit, but trying to create for himself by himself has hurt Harden and his team too many times.

The last major concern for the starters is the point guard situation, which might get significantly worse. Jeremy Lin is a solid point guard, but there’s a very real chance he doesn’t noticeably improve. His three point field goal percentage nudged up as the year progressed, but that is only one of the factors he needs to address. His off-hand dribbling is a place he seems to be (justifiably) putting in effort, and it’s good to see he knows his strengths and weaknesses. There’s also a concern for his health (and to be fair that of James Harden as well, for similar reasons) due to his frequency of trips to the basket and his previous injury history. Dwyane Wade has been criticized for the cumulative injury cause by years of crashing into players and hardwood under the basket, and Lin may be looking at a similar future.

Jeremy Lin might also be looking at the bench. There are some convincing reasons why Ömer Aşık and Jeremy Lin might make an amazing bench tandem. Lin has also spoken about being benched at the end of games, meaning either head coach Kevin McHale doesn’t fully trust Lin, or Jeremy feels that McHale doesn’t trust him. Neither scenario says anything good about Lin’s confidence or comfort level. Experiments with benching Lin in favor of Patrick Beverley might sour team chemistry, something which is a recurring concern.

So, what if McHale can’t figure out how to manage egos and rotations? What if this year’s sophomores don’t pan out at all? What if Ömer Aşık forces a poor trade and Dwight Howard is hurting? What if Harden and Lin miss dozens of games each with nagging injuries caused by constant contact? All this leads to a team that might spend games with Parsons as the best player on the floor, and inconsistent veterans coming off the bench as major questions marks when the team needs answers. The Rockets are a playoff lock at this point, but the issues could pull them down to the 8th seed once again if everything goes wrong. A sub-50 win record and a first round exit would be the most likely scenario. For a team that just raised the bar so high, that would be an abject failure as a season. The bad news is that’s how far they could fall. The good news is that soon we’ll examine just how high they could soar.

 

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Total comments: 44
  • CC. says 11 months ago

    Most bulls fans were bandwagoners for MJ. Those that stayed with the Bulls are decent.

    Chicago Fans break down into

    1.Legitimate 90s fans still loving their Windy City team

    2.Derrick Rose Bandwagoners

    3.The general consumer who shops at Foot Locker or an Adidas store

    and even the Adidas in Houston sells more D. Rose merch than Rockets merch...

  • Hockey the Harden Way says 11 months ago

    Best Case.....

    1. Howard returns to the form that made him a force with Orlando.

    2. Asik accepts role in coexisting with Dwight. Gives Rockets 48 minutes of top center and board play.

    3. Lin shows a much stronger left, three-point shot, and becomes sure handed in traffic.

    4. Harden shows a much stronger right, if he can Euro-Step in the other direction, he'll be devastating.

    5. McHale learns how to extend the bench during heavy scheduling, and a greater variety of half-court plays.

    6. The Rockets win at least 60 games this season, and is at least a two seed.

    Worst Case....

    1. Howard's play continues from his season with the Lakers.

    2. Asik becomes lost in the Dwight ordeal, and demands to be traded.

    3. Lin continues to be unable to finish left or handle the ball in traffic.

    4. Harden gets hurt, and misses at least 10 games.

    5. McHale continues to go eight or nine deep every game, and forces threes and layups when the defense only allows midrange jumpers.

    6. The Rockets season is a carbon copy of the Lakers last season, except there would be no Kobe to salvage the playoffs.

  • timetodienow1234567 says 11 months ago It just goes to show how many fans they had back in the day.
  • Buckko says 11 months ago You do know how many sellouts they have.
  • timetodienow1234567 says 11 months ago Most bulls fans were bandwagoners for MJ. Those that stayed with the Bulls are decent.
  • Buckko says 11 months ago Ya trailblazers fans have stayed with their franchise to hell and back, celtics fans are there to the end while laker fans are fickle, demanding, and Kobe obsessed idiots.
  • BrentYen says 11 months ago

    Please define good or best here?.....

  • Rockets12 says 11 months ago

    and Chicago, totally forgot about them

  • Rockets12 says 11 months ago

    imo the best fanbases are the Lakers, Celtics, Trailblazers, and Thunder. The rockets and warriors are good too, although the warriors are mainly kings fans jumping on the bandwagon

  • CC. says 11 months ago

    Best fan based in basketball are Chicago, OKC, and GSW.

    I agree with this, but the Spurs also have a dedicated and loyal fan base here in south Texas. It's like that, when your city doesn't sport a big name football team, Spurs and OKC citizens have mostly basketball to look forward to. Those two in particular don't have mlb teams either. So the Spurs fan base really differs from a team like the Dallas Mavs.

  • CC. says 11 months ago

    CC there is a reality. Howard will meke the Rockets better. Calm down.

    I think you didn't read when I typed "And I'm not saying [Dwight> will of course"

    ...and didn't you read the title of this post? I can be hypothetical can't I?? :lol:

    But I highly believe if we do worse than an 8th seed this year, it's because we got out of sync and the chemistry is missing. Or we got injured. But it's as simple as that! And actually if we trade Lin (and I don't count Asik because we'll do fine without him as a back-up, even though we would be better) and get a new PG that can't let us roll smoothly with Harden and Howard-again it messes with our chances to lose out on the playoffs.

    And currently, Dwight is the 'biggest' player we just acquired that can take the chemistry away, alter the playbook, and slow us down. Because it won't be Harden who played just fine with us last season and took us to the playoffs, and it won't be Delfino a player who's not with us anymore because no bench player that left this summer was a great loss to the team.

    We can't expect it'll be all fine for us-just look at the Laker squad from last year. People we're placing them #2 seed out west. And even though it might not be Howard's cause (or Kobe's) this time, we got to accept the possibility. This is the 'Houston Rockets' after all-the last decade wasn't so lucky for us even with Hall of Famers on our team.

  • Cooper says 11 months ago Kobe has as big a chip on his shoulder as MJ did, if they sneak into the playoffs and gasol is still healthy they will win some games agaisnt whoever. Unlikely situaition that the rockets do play them though doubt they get a top 2 seed.
  • BrentYen says 11 months ago

    It's not Jesus or MJ. Now if Kobe has the ball the entire game and is the only one scoring because he doesn't pass. I'm fine with that, we would kill them.

    Well that's obviously how most team killed LAL. :lol: .

  • Buckko says 11 months ago It's not Jesus or MJ. Now if Kobe has the ball the entire game and is the only one scoring because he doesn't pass. I'm fine with that, we would kill them.
  • Cooper says 11 months ago

    You do remember Kobe is 34 or is it 35 and coming off one of the worst hind of injuries you can have?

    Its Kobe Bryant.
  • Buckko says 11 months ago You do remember Kobe is 34 or is it 35 and coming off one of the worst hind of injuries you can have?
  • timetodienow1234567 says 11 months ago

    I could see that happening with Harden being the defender.

  • Cooper says 11 months ago It would be best to avoid the lakers in the first round. The rest of the team outside of gasol is pretty much garbage but if Kobe is in full Fu mode against Howard and gets like 40 a game they could be like those early 2000's sixers when iverson took them to the finals not to mention the media circus that would ensue.
  • timetodienow1234567 says 11 months ago The rockets have the best fan base. Along with SAS and GSW. At least from my perspective.
  • Buckko says 11 months ago Best fan based in basketball are Chicago, OKC, and GSW.
  • Buckko says 11 months ago When you take as many shots and handle the ball as much as Kobe, of course you will score 2 more points. However harden was much more efficient and Kobe was actually an even worse defender than harden. The laker fan base are fickle and arrongent, Kobe obsessed maniacs. That man can do no wrong in their eyes.
  • Rockets12 says 11 months ago

    @buckko I dont like the lakers but they have one of the best fan bases in all of sports and kobe last year was much better than james harden. But back to the point. Best case scenario for the Rockets would be the WCF, but they will not beat the Spurs, Clippers, or Thunder. Worst Case scenario would be: struggle to make the playoffs, Dwight complaining about coaching and James Harden's touches. Dwight although a great talent is a diva and most of his points were off dunks or the pick and roll(which he refused to run in LA. Bitch move btw)

  • rockets best fan says 12 months ago

    I think D-12 will be just fine. now that he is his regular happy go lucky self we will start to see the numbers he use to put up. I don't for seeany problems of him meshing with our team. remember he chose us.....he didn't choose LA.......BIG DIFFERENCE

  • Buckko says 12 months ago As far as I know we don't have a Kobe, terrible fan base, and a brittle bone injury prone team to make Dwight cry.
  • BrentYen says 12 months ago

    DH is a very big factor, but I do not think it will be a binary scenario. The most interesting part of bball statistical wise is you can not DE-correlate the performance of all rotational players.

  • NorEastern says 12 months ago

    CC there is a reality. Howard will meke the Rockets better. Calm down.

  • CC. says 12 months ago

    If we make a worse win record than the previous season, can't we simply pin it to Dwight? I think of it as almost binary logic-if we become worse, there's no other new player that can affect this team other than Dwight. It can't be Harden, Parsons, or Asik -because they solidly improved our team into getting us into the playoffs, and it can't even be Lin, because him starting for us did not degrade the team. It can't be our bench either, because we kept over half of the bench rotation from last year and even they can't contribute as much as the starters per minute wise, so...

    Dwight is the only factor that can makes us become worse than an 8th seed (Okay, well player injuries could derail us from the playoffs also). And I'm not saying he will of course, but he's the only one that could un-synchronize the team. Asik loses his natural center flow offensively and defensively while starting with him (if he does), he gets sent to the bench, becomes unhappy and his numbers go down-along with his value (but that's another topic). Dwight doesn't get the ball because of Harden's playmaking and the others' perimeter action. Dwight doesn't get the attention, becomes unhappy, another decent seasons from him, etc. etc.

    So like I said, it's almost binary-

    Happy Dwight=No worse than 8th seed, make the playoffs.

    Unhappy Dwight=Become 2012/2013 Lakers, settle into fighting for 8th seed.

    Even before we acquired Dwight, the sports media knew our core of Lin, Harden, Parsons, Asik would improve from last season-getting us a better record. But now we got Dwight and like how we saw last season with his team-the expectations could be too much. Then again-injuries could be a huge factor too-but just looking at what we have present wise in an almost healthy team-Dwight could change us and possibly not for the better.

  • Buckko says 12 months ago Also deep benches help a lot.
  • Buckko says 12 months ago On the back to backs, that will improve dramatically with the rockets becoming a better and more experienced team.
  • NorEastern says 12 months ago

    Honestly what you have laid out is a dream scenario. But you are not the first to predict a finals appearance for the Rockets. A couple of things worry me. The first is my post on CF: http://bbs.clutchfans.net/showthread.php?t=243778. I do not see how Morey has addressed the problems presented in this post. The second of course is the PF position. The Rockets only need the PF to provide 35% from behind the three point line and only adequate defense. I do not know if they will get that next season. D-Mo is showing improvement in FIBA, but Caspi could not be worse. TJ is a complete unknown who did not play anywhere near statistically significant minutes last season. Parsons? I do not know.

  • Buckko says 12 months ago Can you make an article about our real competitor from the East, the Pacers. They destroyed us last season and we'll meet in the preseason. A sign of things to come :)
  • rockets best fan says 12 months ago

    WHAT DO YOU MEAN IT'S POSSIBLE?............THIS IS WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN :lol:see you at the parade

  • Red94 says 12 months ago New post: What's the Best that Could Happen?
    By: Forrest Walker

    The NBA season is drawing ever closer, and soon every newly minted contender will have to back up their championship hopes with championship play. The Houston Rockets, as newly-minted challengers to the throne, are under pressure to meet lofty goals. On Monday we looked at how it could all fall apart. Today, we examine what might happen when everything goes according to plan. What’s the best case scenario for Houston?

    The short answer is very short: NBA Championship. That’s every team’s end goal, and every team’s potential best-case scenario. The difference between saying that for, say, the Washington Wizards and saying that for the Houston Rockets is the level of realism in the prediction. Washington, while much improved this year, and reasonably able to make the playoffs, are a far cry from the Eastern Conference’s elite teams. There’s a plausibly possible scenario in which they could take home a championship this season, but it would involve major injuries at just the right time to a dozen players, or a complete transformation into superstars for several Wizards.

    Houston’s scenario is much more clear cut. If one simply examines realistic contingencies, Houston’s best case is still winning it all. By no means is this the most likely outcome, but it’s a one that the Rockets could achieve largely by factors they can control, such as the skill and performance of their players, and not by strokes of ill fortune by other teams, such as injury. What would this season look like, then?

    The best way for a team to help themselves to a Larry O’Brien trophy is holding home court advantage as often as possible in the playoffs. Simply having the best record overall is always a goal for contending teams, and a stunning regular season would be optimal for Houston. If everything clicks, if Ömer Aşık becomes a super reserve, if all the new role players perform to potential, this could happen. The Rockets are positioned to have one of the deeper benches in the league, and bench depth is an elite team’s best friend in the regular season.

    While players like Luol Deng, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Durant toil for over 38 minutes a game, teams like the San Antonio Spurs choose to give their starters plenty of rest in season. If head coach Kevin McHale can be convinced to let the backups carry more of the load, the Rockets could follow a similar path. While the difference between 38 and 35 minutes a game has been debated recently, there benefits of a Spurs style bench use are threefold. Long, meaningful rest, and entire days off give players a break from the grind, helping players maintain their longevity. Freshness in season and time added to the end of a player’s career are the goal.

    But even if that’s oversold, the other two benefits are very tangible. Playing reserve units allows them to develop more chemistry, and allows the team to identify the skills and fit of those players. There’s no substitute for actual NBA minutes, and playing an entire reserve group outside of garbage time can lead to a more skilled and better-managed bench lineup.

    The last benefit is purely mental, and has been discussed less than the others. Resting players, especially for games at a time, shows that their physical and mental well-being is the team’s top priority. This requires the team to be confident enough to effectively give up on certain games, but that’s the level of confidence the Rockets will need to find before they can find a ring. Giving James Harden and Dwight Howard a road game off here and there could be used to build up trust between the team and the stars, as well as letting them save something for the playoffs.

    So these hypothetical Rockets are keeping their stars’ minutes down and winning games thanks to an elite bench that includes Ömer Aşık and Patrick Beverley. They’ve also been mastering the pick and roll offense, a weapon which was already deadly. Now, with continued staggering of Jeremy Lin and James Harden parallel to the Dwight Howard and Ömer Aşık minutes stagger, there’s always a high-level screen and roll threat on the floor. In the rare case that a team goes big to try to shut down interior offense and rebounding, the Rockets respond with a devastating duo of big men to overpower them. Dwight Howard has also picked up an increasingly effective post game, thanks in equal part to the deadly ballet of Olajuwon’s teachings and the fundamental soundness of McHale’s expertise.

    When the season comes to an end, these potential Rockets have found a chemistry that allows them to compete for 48 minutes a game, and have won over 60 of them. They’ll have home court advantage in the first three rounds, and maybe even the finals if the Heat slip even a little bit. What do the playoffs look like, then?

    All the resting the starters were doing is suddenly in the past. Harden, Lin, Howard, Chandler Parsons, and whichever power forward made the leap will be playing big minutes, and able to play as hard as they want. When they do need to sit, an experienced and cohesive group can filter in one by one without disrupting the gameplan. Most importantly, the opposing basket will be under lock and key by two elite defensive centers for 48 minutes a night. Howard’s athletic defense and Aşık’s methodical prowess could vault Houston’s defense into the top echelon if players like Parsons have  energy available on defense. A more focused offense allows players to work less on that end, and even James Harden might be able to devote some small sliver of effort to defending the ball. Maybe.

    If Houston is the top seed in the west, they’ll get the privilege of meeting the 8th seed in the first round. While the west is stacked from spots one to six, place eight looks to be an easy out for the top team. The 7th and 8th seeds will be reserved for teams like the Dallas Mavericks, New Orleans Pelicans, Portland Trail Blazers, Minnesota Timberwolves and Los Angeles Lakers. Of all of those, the Lakers would be the most dramatic matchup, and would instantly turn the world’s eyes to Dwight Howard and Houston. Moving on to the winner of the 4 vs 5 matchup after a quick dispatch of the Lakers would be the best possible first round.

    The second round is harder to predict. The Oklahoma City Thunder are too good to fall below third seed in anything but a total injury disaster. That leaves the Spurs and Los Angeles Clippers as the most likely candidates for the 4th seed, with the other joining OKC in the 2-3 range. The Spurs have been consistent and victorious in the regular season for years, which means the Clippers would be the safer bet. While the Grizzlies remain strong, and improved Warriors team could easily snap up the 5th seed, leading to a brutal showdown between the two top California teams. The best case for Houston would be another first round exit for Chris Paul and his Clips. If there’s one thing that can get a team excited, it’s a playoff series against a new rival.

    After a tough series, the Golden State Warriors would be tired but still deadly. The best case would be two teams with vaguely similar makeup and offenses meeting to discover who does it better. The shootoff between Harden and Steph Curry would be one for the ages, with Dwight Howard and Andrew Bogut battling one another down low. A Rockets victory here would not only give us one of the most exciting series of the year, but also prove that Houston can survive offensive onslaughts. On, then, to the conference finals.

    In this theoretical world, the biggest question is who the Rockets have to beat to make the finals. The Spurs and the Thunder would also provide an amazing second round series, of which only one could be the victor. For motivational purposes, a conference finals battle with the Thunder would be more meaningful than a victory over the current Western Conference Champions, but only by the smallest of margins. A true showdown with Harden’s old team would bring a level of intensity to the third round that was sorely missing last year. Neither team would sweep the other as the Spurs did the Memphis Grizzlies. In most universes, the Thunder would pull out a win and move on to the Finals. In the universe we’re discussing, a few incredible plays from Harden and Parsons pull out the series, leading Houston to their first Finals appearance in twenty years.

    There can be no other opponent than the reigning Miami Heat in the Finals. LeBron James is at the peak of his abilities, and Chris Bosh is far better than he’s given credit for. The biggest question mark that matters is Dwyane Wade and his ongoing durability issues. He remains one of the best guards in the league, but has slowed down noticeably. He’ll still put up two amazing performances in the NBA Finals, but unless something can be done to turn the tides of time, he could realistically turn in a few very poor games.

    A sweep or quick win would be beautiful for Houston diehards, but the best case for the team would be a dramatic win in game 7. A last second drive to the lane by Harden that ends with someone sinking a buzzer beating three to seal the game in Miami, if we’re getting specific, would be the greatest possible end to this season for Houston. That’s what the last seconds of the Rockets’ season would look like.

    As this increasingly fanciful exercise shows, winning it all is quite conceivable for Houston. It isn’t particularly likely, and would require the Rockets to either be a lot better than expected or for everyone else to be worse than expected. Chemistry would have to flourish, and McHale’s minutes usage would need to take a massive turn. It’s possible, though, and how long it stays possible throughout the season will measure how good Houston’s season turns out.

  • NorEastern says 12 months ago

    Considering that Howard's "down" year still had him as the best center in the NBA ...

  • rockets best fan says 12 months ago

    Honestly one thing I have always been happy about is our players great character which gives me very little worry about the asik or lin situations you mention. Lin and asik is are fantastic hard workers along with being a foreign player and the other raised by immigrants and yall know what I mean by that. That's why the spurs are a dynasty is because of foreigners.

    I agree both Lin and Asik are great characters guys, but it's one thing to believe you were the shiggady (listening to too much Tom Joyner in the morning :lol:) and a whole different position to being relegated to one of the minions. not all players can make that transition no matter how great their character

  • Buckko says 1 YEAR ago

    Honestly one thing I have always been happy about is our players great character which gives me very little worry about the asik or lin situations you mention. Lin and asik is are fantastic hard workers along with being a foreign player and the other raised by immigrants and yall know what I mean by that. That's why the spurs are a dynasty is because of foreigners.

  • rockets best fan says 1 YEAR ago

    Worst case the entire starting line up gets kidnapped and they have to start the bench: Asik, Brewer, Beverley, Jones, and Garcia would be a formidable team in the East!

    welcome to the forum :) love your avatar.................the team you mention would probably make the playoffs in the east

  • David says 1 YEAR ago

    Worst case the entire starting line up gets kidnapped and they have to start the bench: Asik, Brewer, Beverley, Jones, and Garcia would be a formidable team in the East!

  • rockets best fan says 1 YEAR ago

    If Asik and Lin have to go back to bench, they obviously will not be happy. But if that happen, I think they will not have PROBLEMs playing for the team to win. They've got their money, they will seek their trade possibilities, they both should be OK playing b4 any potential trades unlike how DH12 did in LA.

    true I don't believe they will be a problem if this scenario plays out, but you never know.......talk is cheap. it's one thing to sayit, yet a whole different ballgame to live it. none of us would like being demoted on our jobseven if we see the benefit of said change. them going to the bench no matter how you dress it up would be a demotion for two players who were starters last year and assumed they would be important parts of the future of this team. how they handle that aspect may play directly to how long they are here. there are all kinds of ways that this can play out, but should this one play out the Rockets must move them to keep any negative feelings from festering in the team

  • Buckko says 1 YEAR ago

    There are enough reasons to believe none of those worst cases would happen, but yeah, it wouldn't be the weirdest thing ever, remember when Portland was about to go on a dynasty run with Oden / Roy / LMA? that's just sad nowadays.

    That was going to be the best frontcourt in NBA history. Sad thing that it never came to fruition.

  • BrentYen says 1 YEAR ago

    .......................

    I'm more concerned with how (if kept) both Lin and Asik will perform. either of these two can cause chemistry problems if kept and unhappy. training camp will be especially important to the impact both Asik and Lin can provide. if the chemistry doesn't feel right they should be moved before the problem can feste

    If Asik and Lin have to go back to bench, they obviously will not be happy. But if that happen, I think they will not have PROBLEMs playing for the team to win. They've got their money, they will seek their trade possibilities, they both should be OK playing b4 any potential trades unlike how DH12 did in LA.

  • rockets best fan says 1 YEAR ago

    There are enough reasons to believe none of those worst cases would happen, but yeah, it wouldn't be the weirdest thing ever, remember when Portland was about to go on a dynasty run with Oden / Roy / LMA? that's just sad nowadays.

    I agree there are enough reasons to believe that we can put most of the worst case scenarios to rest. while they are still within the realm of possibility, they aren't likely. I suspect most of Howard's problems in LA to fade like the bad memory is was. I agree a player's mental makeup has a lot to do with how he performs. Howard was clearly unhappy andinjuredin LA. both areas contributed to his down year, but both have been fixed to some degree. I'm more concerned with how (if kept) both Lin and Asik will perform. either of these two can cause chemistry problems if kept and unhappy. training camp will be especially important to the impact both Asik and Lin can provide. if the chemistry doesn't feel right they should be moved before the problem can fester.

  • RollingWave says 1 YEAR ago

    There are enough reasons to believe none of those worst cases would happen, but yeah, it wouldn't be the weirdest thing ever, remember when Portland was about to go on a dynasty run with Oden / Roy / LMA? that's just sad nowadays.

  • thenit says 1 YEAR ago Yea I agree on a lot of the issues in this article. This will fall on mchale to workout a proper rotation and keep the egos in check. I'm most worried about the chemistry between harden and Howard. Both wants to be the alpha dog and its a concern IMO, hopefully it will work put