Q&A on Houston Rockets forward Patrick Patterson

I had planned to interview the lead blogger covering the college team of whomever the Houston Rockets came away with on Thursday night.  Little did I know that I would already have his contact information.

Once more, I got together with Glenn Logan of A Sea of Blue, SB Nation’s official Kentucky Wildcats blog, this time, to discuss forward Patrick Patterson.

Rahat: So to start, can you tell us Patrick’s strengths and weaknesses?

Glenn:

Strengths:

From an NBA perspective, Patterson’s strengths are his body, which is mature and NBA-ready.  He has good but not freakish athleticism, very good hands, long arms, an improving handle, good physical strength and a very high basketball IQ.  He is all about the team, and he and Chuck Hayes will set an unbelievable example attitude-wise.  Patterson has a good motor and hates to lose.

Patrick can pass in the post, he can get rebounds and guard people bigger than him.  He has good footwork and seems pretty durable.  He is as coachable as any young man you will ever find, and has the best attitude of any player I have ever had the pleasure to experience.  All you need to know about his work ethic is that he graduated from college in three years, and even though he is intelligent, he is not that smart.  That was all due to determination, planning, and execution.

Patterson can score inside and out to 20 feet, rebound, and guard his position.  He is better the closer to the basket he gets, but he has a nice touch and can shoot it fairly reliably from the college 3-point line.

Weaknesses:

Patrick’s perimeter shot is good, but not quite NBA-ready.  He is not as strong a finisher at the rim as I would like, particularly over size.  Patrick has a tendency to defer too much, and he hasn’t quite figured out when to assert himself and when to defer to others.  He also needs to improve his rebounding as far as consistency is concerned — he would have a 10-rebound game and follow that up with a 3-rebound game.  Patrick needs to learn to bring the rebounding every game.  Patterson also needs to learn how to guard smaller players.

Patterson needs to improve his ball handling to be a combo forward in the NBA.  His handle isn’t bad for college, but it needs to improve quite a bit before it will be NBA-ready, particularly his left hand.  Pat also has to learn to go to his left, which he almost never did in college.  Patterson was a great free throw shooter in his sophomore year, but not so much in his junior year.  That inconsistency needs some attention.  His shot release is a touch flat and a bit too much off the index finger, which puts him off line more than he should be.  He will have to learn the pick-and-roll, as that was not a big part of his college experience, but he should be good, especially as a screener.

Patterson is not a good shooter off the dribble, nor can he get his own shot yet.  Once he develops a better handle, those two skills should come, at least from 20 feet and in.

Rahat: Does he have a post-up game?

Glenn: Indeed he does.  The fist two years he played at Kentucky, Patrick Patterson was exclusively a post-up player and shot maybe twice from the arc.  He very rarely took a shot outside of 10 feet.  In fact, Patterson was among the most dominant post players in the SEC both his freshman and sophomore years.

It was for this reason and his relatively small size for an NBA post player that he came back to Kentucky for a third year.  In that year he focused on developing a perimeter game and getting to the basket off the dribble.  He was pretty successful in both efforts, and that definitely raised his stock in the eyes of NBA GM’s and coaches.

Rahat: I guess where I am confused is your emphasis upon his poor ball-handling.  Interesting because the ESPN graphic upon his drafting also cited this area as his weakness.  Most power forwards are relatively poor ball-handlers and very few can take their man off the dribble.  When you say that Patrick is a poor ball-handler, do you mean even for a power forward (which would make him downright awful for an NBA player), or do you mean for a combo-forward with hopes of playing some ‘3’?

Glenn: I don’t believe I ever said Patrick Patterson was a poor ballhandler.  I believe I said his ballhandling wasn’t bad for college, but it wasn’t quite NBA ready, particularly his left hand.

For two years, Patterson played on the block as a back-to-the-basket player.  Last year, he made a determined effort to  improve his ballhandling and did so, and he was able to take his man off the dribble a few times.  The problem is, he really didn’t need to do it that much.

Patterson’s role in the offense last year was as the second option behind Cousins in the half-court, and the first or second option on the break.  When he was the first option, he ran the floor to get into position to receive one of many lobs from Wall or Bledsoe.  When he was the second option, Wall would try to get to the rim on the break, and if that failed, Patterson ran the secondary break and would spot up at the top of the key for a 3-point shot before the defense would get set up.  Since everyone played zone against UK, that spot was always open.

In the half court, option #1 for Kentucky was Cousins, usually on the left block because that’s where he could make that spin move to the baseline.  When the double-team came, if it came from the top, Patterson would slide into the short corner.  The ball would get rotated to Bledsoe or Wall, who would drive into the middle, draw Patterson’s defender, and Patrick would get the short jumper.  If the double team came from Patterson’s man, Cousins would dump it to Patterson for the dunk.

Patterson took basically shot the ball from four spots all year:  The right short corner, the right deep corner, the top of the key, and layups.  90% of those were off the catch, so he had very little actual opportunity to show off his ballhandling or use it.  But when he did, it was always to the right and usually off a catch near the elbow, where he would slash to the rim.

Patterson has an above-average handle for a 4-man, and a below-average handle for a 3.  He will get much better, primarily by developing his left hand so he is not so predictable, but he is not a bad ball handler for either position.






About the author: Rahat Huq is a lawyer in real life and the founder and editor-in-chief of Red94.net.

in conversations
  • Sir Thursday

    Great interview! Nice to get an in-depth analysis from someone who obviously knows his stuff. The personality/character of Double P (I like that nickname, hope it catches on) have been bandied about plenty, so it’s interesting to get a more technical breakdown than the “solid, ready to contribute” schtick that most commentators seem to fall back on without really going into specifics. Cheers!

  • Sir Thursday

    Great interview! Nice to get an in-depth analysis from someone who obviously knows his stuff. The personality/character of Double P (I like that nickname, hope it catches on) have been bandied about plenty, so it’s interesting to get a more technical breakdown than the “solid, ready to contribute” schtick that most commentators seem to fall back on without really going into specifics. Cheers!

  • Rocket Fan in Santa Barbara

    I liked the interview as well. It is intriguing that Patterson might play some at the 3 as well as the 4. I’m not sure how realistic it is, but you could imagine in some situations the Rockets going really big and playing a front line of Hill, Yao, and Patterson. That might be far fetched for now, but maybe not so much in a couple of years if Patterson (who seems to be a really hard worker) really develops his perimeter game and ball handling skills.

    It is nice to have a draft choice who gets better and better the more you know about him…

  • Rocket Fan in Santa Barbara

    I liked the interview as well. It is intriguing that Patterson might play some at the 3 as well as the 4. I’m not sure how realistic it is, but you could imagine in some situations the Rockets going really big and playing a front line of Hill, Yao, and Patterson. That might be far fetched for now, but maybe not so much in a couple of years if Patterson (who seems to be a really hard worker) really develops his perimeter game and ball handling skills.

    It is nice to have a draft choice who gets better and better the more you know about him…

  • Patrick Lee

    sorry this is off topic, but didn’t know where to post it. what about this dream scenario?

    rockets sign & trade for lebron james:
    -aaron brooks
    -trevor ariza
    -jared jeffries (expiring contract)
    -2011 first round pick
    -new york’s 2012 first round pick

    rockets sign & trade for chris bosh:
    -luis scola
    -chase budinger
    -shane battier (expiring contract)
    -rights to swap 2011 first round picks with new york
    -2012 first round pick

    bring over sergio llull from spain (we have his draft rights)

    afterwards, we’d have a lineup of:

    PG – kyle lowry, sergio llull
    SG – kevin martin, jermaine taylor
    SF – lebron james, mike harris, alexander johnson
    PF – chris bosh, patrick patterson, chuck hayes
    C – yao ming, jordan hill, david andersen

  • Patrick Lee

    sorry this is off topic, but didn’t know where to post it. what about this dream scenario?

    rockets sign & trade for lebron james:
    -aaron brooks
    -trevor ariza
    -jared jeffries (expiring contract)
    -2011 first round pick
    -new york’s 2012 first round pick

    rockets sign & trade for chris bosh:
    -luis scola
    -chase budinger
    -shane battier (expiring contract)
    -rights to swap 2011 first round picks with new york
    -2012 first round pick

    bring over sergio llull from spain (we have his draft rights)

    afterwards, we’d have a lineup of:

    PG – kyle lowry, sergio llull
    SG – kevin martin, jermaine taylor
    SF – lebron james, mike harris, alexander johnson
    PF – chris bosh, patrick patterson, chuck hayes
    C – yao ming, jordan hill, david andersen

  • rahat huq

    Sir Thursday – thanks, yeah, Glenn was great. I was desperate to learn more from someone other than Patrick being a “great kid, hard worker.”

    Santa Barbara – I’ll have to wait and watch him play, but I’m a bit skeptical on that. At the least, it is nice to have a true-sized ‘4’ with range.

    Patrick – no problem posting that in here. You need to send back atleast $13mill to both and your Toronto scenario isn’t enough – Scola will be BYC, meaning he’ll only count for half in trades, and draft picks don’t count as anything.

  • rahat huq

    Sir Thursday – thanks, yeah, Glenn was great. I was desperate to learn more from someone other than Patrick being a “great kid, hard worker.”

    Santa Barbara – I’ll have to wait and watch him play, but I’m a bit skeptical on that. At the least, it is nice to have a true-sized ‘4’ with range.

    Patrick – no problem posting that in here. You need to send back atleast $13mill to both and your Toronto scenario isn’t enough – Scola will be BYC, meaning he’ll only count for half in trades, and draft picks don’t count as anything.

  • Randy

    Nice interview.
    Rahat, I read your previous post about the difficulties of developing shot-creating abilities after entering the NBA. How do you feel Patterson will develop, having much better handling skills like Glenn said, or something like Ariza’s try this year?

  • Randy

    Nice interview.
    Rahat, I read your previous post about the difficulties of developing shot-creating abilities after entering the NBA. How do you feel Patterson will develop, having much better handling skills like Glenn said, or something like Ariza’s try this year?

  • rahat huq

    Randy – Unfortunately, since I don’t follow college basketball, I can’t really pass any judgment on that until I watch him play. I would say though that it’s a different ballgame for big men. Notice last year how Carl Landry could take his man off the dribble, but always using the same move? (drive left, spin back right). That wouldnt work for a guard/wing, but for bigs, having one or two functional dribble moves can take you a really long way.

  • rahat huq

    Randy – Unfortunately, since I don’t follow college basketball, I can’t really pass any judgment on that until I watch him play. I would say though that it’s a different ballgame for big men. Notice last year how Carl Landry could take his man off the dribble, but always using the same move? (drive left, spin back right). That wouldnt work for a guard/wing, but for bigs, having one or two functional dribble moves can take you a really long way.

  • Patrick Lee

    ok, how about this?

    rockets sign & trade for lebron james:
    +aaron brooks
    +trevor ariza
    +jared jeffries (expiring contract)
    +2011 first round pick
    +new york’s 2012 first round pick
    +2012 second round pick
    +$3 million cash

    rockets sign & trade for chris bosh:
    +luis scola
    +jordan hill
    +shane battier (expiring contract)
    +rights to swap 2011 first round picks with new york
    +2011 second round pick
    +2012 first round pick
    +$3 million cash

    bring over sergio llull from spain (we have his draft rights)
    offer all or part of the MLE to brad miller

    afterwards, we’d have a lineup of:

    PG – kyle lowry, sergio llull
    SG – kevin martin, jermaine taylor, mike harris
    SF – lebron james, chase budinger, alexander johnson
    PF – chris bosh, patrick patterson, chuck hayes
    C – yao ming, brad miller, david andersen

  • Patrick Lee

    ok, how about this?

    rockets sign & trade for lebron james:
    +aaron brooks
    +trevor ariza
    +jared jeffries (expiring contract)
    +2011 first round pick
    +new york’s 2012 first round pick
    +2012 second round pick
    +$3 million cash

    rockets sign & trade for chris bosh:
    +luis scola
    +jordan hill
    +shane battier (expiring contract)
    +rights to swap 2011 first round picks with new york
    +2011 second round pick
    +2012 first round pick
    +$3 million cash

    bring over sergio llull from spain (we have his draft rights)
    offer all or part of the MLE to brad miller

    afterwards, we’d have a lineup of:

    PG – kyle lowry, sergio llull
    SG – kevin martin, jermaine taylor, mike harris
    SF – lebron james, chase budinger, alexander johnson
    PF – chris bosh, patrick patterson, chuck hayes
    C – yao ming, brad miller, david andersen

  • rahat huq

    Patrick – at quick glance, the money on that seems to work.

  • rahat huq

    Patrick – at quick glance, the money on that seems to work.

  • Patrick Lee

    i know i’m dreaming, but here are some more thoughts on how this could happen:

    this team might not have quite as strong of a starting 5 versus if lebron and bosh went to chicago, but it’s close. it’s also deeper than any team that chicago, miami, or new york could put together since they’ve gutted their teams in order to clear cap space (llull and patterson would be very experienced as far as rookies go).

    if lebron and bosh do a sign & trade instead of outright signing with a new team, then they’d earn around $30 million more doing so.

    additionally, there is no state tax in houston, so they’d end up saving a lot of money that way.

    plus with the “yao ming effect”, they’d end up with a lot more fans and a lot more endorsements from china. resulting in even more money and more worldwide appeal.

    so from a financial and competitive standpoint, a sign & trade to the rockets makes a lot of sense for lebron and bosh (assuming both go together). financially, they’d probably make more with the rockets than with any other team in the league.

    so, if the cavs and the raptors are convinced that lebron and bosh are going to sign with other teams, then doing a sign & trade at least gets them back something.

    if they are going to do a sign & trade, then the rockets have a lot of pieces to make this happen. yes, some teams could offer more (like if the lakers offered bynum for bosh) — but if lebron and bosh forced a sign & trade to specifically to houston, the cavs and raptors would still get a decent return.

    everyone wins.

  • Patrick Lee

    i know i’m dreaming, but here are some more thoughts on how this could happen:

    this team might not have quite as strong of a starting 5 versus if lebron and bosh went to chicago, but it’s close. it’s also deeper than any team that chicago, miami, or new york could put together since they’ve gutted their teams in order to clear cap space (llull and patterson would be very experienced as far as rookies go).

    if lebron and bosh do a sign & trade instead of outright signing with a new team, then they’d earn around $30 million more doing so.

    additionally, there is no state tax in houston, so they’d end up saving a lot of money that way.

    plus with the “yao ming effect”, they’d end up with a lot more fans and a lot more endorsements from china. resulting in even more money and more worldwide appeal.

    so from a financial and competitive standpoint, a sign & trade to the rockets makes a lot of sense for lebron and bosh (assuming both go together). financially, they’d probably make more with the rockets than with any other team in the league.

    so, if the cavs and the raptors are convinced that lebron and bosh are going to sign with other teams, then doing a sign & trade at least gets them back something.

    if they are going to do a sign & trade, then the rockets have a lot of pieces to make this happen. yes, some teams could offer more (like if the lakers offered bynum for bosh) — but if lebron and bosh forced a sign & trade to specifically to houston, the cavs and raptors would still get a decent return.

    everyone wins.

  • rahat huq

    Patrick Lee: i know i’m dreaming, but here are some more thoughts on how this could happen:    

    The main obstacle is that I just don’t see Cleveland agreeing to facilitate Lebron’s departure. The case is drastically different from the one with Toronto where they have pretty much come to terms with Bosh leaving and just want to make the best of the situation.

  • rahat huq

    Patrick Lee: i know i’m dreaming, but here are some more thoughts on how this could happen:    

    The main obstacle is that I just don’t see Cleveland agreeing to facilitate Lebron’s departure. The case is drastically different from the one with Toronto where they have pretty much come to terms with Bosh leaving and just want to make the best of the situation.

  • Stephen

    Remember how Scola used to get a ton of uncontested baseline jumpers? How Morey and Co. deeply believe in the corner 3?
    From the interview it looks like Patterson can be pretty good from the basket on a line out to corner 3.
    So it looks like Morey drafted a player who’s offensive skill sets meshes nicely w/where the Rockets’ offense generates open looks.
    Interesting concept-acquiring talented players who fit your system. Something the Lakers and Patriots have been quite successful with.

    And this could be G’Day Dave as he looks like odd man out if Patterson can make 20’+ jumpers in the NBA.
    Assuming no trades and Scola re-signed,that’s Yao,Scola,Hill,Patterson,Hayes,Andersen and Jeffries.(Adelman used Jeffries as a PF and C exclusively.) If,as Morey indicated in his remarks to season ticket holders after draft,the team intends to get another big,that would be 8 bigs,leaving the Rockets once again very thin at PG and no roster room for emergencies.

    LeBron I will believe when I see him introduced at his “Welcome to Houston” press conference. But fun to kick the tires.
    As to potential trades,why take expiring contracts when you can get a whopping TPE and salary relief otherwise.
    If I’m Cleveland-huge shudder-I might prefer a package of Brooks,Martin,Battier,Hill,the 2011 First and the lower of the 2012s for LeBron and Mo Williams(ecch).
    Brooks,Martin,Battier,Varejao,Hill is a Playoff contender in East,you have a pretty deep bench and you’re under Lux Tax.
    LeBron isn’t in the East so you’ve hurt one of your competitors and you could realistically expect to be in the 4-6 range.
    On the Houston side,Ariza may not be an Alpha SG but a SG who can defend,shoot open 3s,run the court and cut back-door for lobs-he can do that all night long.
    I really don’t see Morey giving away all his young talent for one player,so if Brooks and Hill are going Bud stays.
    Rockets starting line-up is prob Lowry,Ariza,LeBron,Scola,Yao. Second unit of Peterson,Taylor,Bud,Patterson,Jeffries/Hayes/FA.
    This team could run and you just know there’d be some small ball units w/Lowry,Peterson and LeBron at PF.
    Fun to dream,but like most everybody else,think there’s a snowball’s chance in Houston of happening.

  • Stephen

    Remember how Scola used to get a ton of uncontested baseline jumpers? How Morey and Co. deeply believe in the corner 3?
    From the interview it looks like Patterson can be pretty good from the basket on a line out to corner 3.
    So it looks like Morey drafted a player who’s offensive skill sets meshes nicely w/where the Rockets’ offense generates open looks.
    Interesting concept-acquiring talented players who fit your system. Something the Lakers and Patriots have been quite successful with.

    And this could be G’Day Dave as he looks like odd man out if Patterson can make 20’+ jumpers in the NBA.
    Assuming no trades and Scola re-signed,that’s Yao,Scola,Hill,Patterson,Hayes,Andersen and Jeffries.(Adelman used Jeffries as a PF and C exclusively.) If,as Morey indicated in his remarks to season ticket holders after draft,the team intends to get another big,that would be 8 bigs,leaving the Rockets once again very thin at PG and no roster room for emergencies.

    LeBron I will believe when I see him introduced at his “Welcome to Houston” press conference. But fun to kick the tires.
    As to potential trades,why take expiring contracts when you can get a whopping TPE and salary relief otherwise.
    If I’m Cleveland-huge shudder-I might prefer a package of Brooks,Martin,Battier,Hill,the 2011 First and the lower of the 2012s for LeBron and Mo Williams(ecch).
    Brooks,Martin,Battier,Varejao,Hill is a Playoff contender in East,you have a pretty deep bench and you’re under Lux Tax.
    LeBron isn’t in the East so you’ve hurt one of your competitors and you could realistically expect to be in the 4-6 range.
    On the Houston side,Ariza may not be an Alpha SG but a SG who can defend,shoot open 3s,run the court and cut back-door for lobs-he can do that all night long.
    I really don’t see Morey giving away all his young talent for one player,so if Brooks and Hill are going Bud stays.
    Rockets starting line-up is prob Lowry,Ariza,LeBron,Scola,Yao. Second unit of Peterson,Taylor,Bud,Patterson,Jeffries/Hayes/FA.
    This team could run and you just know there’d be some small ball units w/Lowry,Peterson and LeBron at PF.
    Fun to dream,but like most everybody else,think there’s a snowball’s chance in Houston of happening.

  • rahat huq

    Stephen:
    If I’m Cleveland-huge shudder-I might prefer a package of Brooks,Martin,Battier,Hill,the 2011 First and the lower of the 2012s for LeBron and Mo Williams(ecch).
    Brooks,Martin,Battier,Varejao,Hill is a Playoff contender in East,you have a pretty deep bench and you’re under Lux Tax.
    LeBron isn’t in the East so you’ve hurt one of your competitors and you could realistically expect to be in the 4-6 range.
        

    If they agree to S&T, we’re probably in the best position. But what do you think those chances are? Classic realism vs. pragmatism dilemma right there. They can be stubborn and refuse our help or come to terms with the situation and atleast get a decent start on rebuilding. I can’t see the latter happening – it’s Lebron; you just can’t trade a guy like that…too much karma involved.

  • rahat huq

    Stephen:
    If I’m Cleveland-huge shudder-I might prefer a package of Brooks,Martin,Battier,Hill,the 2011 First and the lower of the 2012s for LeBron and Mo Williams(ecch).
    Brooks,Martin,Battier,Varejao,Hill is a Playoff contender in East,you have a pretty deep bench and you’re under Lux Tax.
    LeBron isn’t in the East so you’ve hurt one of your competitors and you could realistically expect to be in the 4-6 range.
        

    If they agree to S&T, we’re probably in the best position. But what do you think those chances are? Classic realism vs. pragmatism dilemma right there. They can be stubborn and refuse our help or come to terms with the situation and atleast get a decent start on rebuilding. I can’t see the latter happening – it’s Lebron; you just can’t trade a guy like that…too much karma involved.

  • Randy

    Unfortunately none of those free agents (bosh, lebron, etc) listed Houston in their dream-list. Lebron I can understand, but i don’t get why bosh wouldn’t consider it. Houston is the exact definition of his heroic need, “we’re going to win a championship, and you’re going to take us there”.

  • Randy

    Unfortunately none of those free agents (bosh, lebron, etc) listed Houston in their dream-list. Lebron I can understand, but i don’t get why bosh wouldn’t consider it. Houston is the exact definition of his heroic need, “we’re going to win a championship, and you’re going to take us there”.

  • rahat huq

    Randy: Unfortunately none of those free agents (bosh, lebron, etc) listed Houston in their dream-list. Lebron I can understand, but i don’t get why bosh wouldn’t consider it. Houston is the exact definition of his heroic need, “we’re going to win a championship, and you’re going to take us there”.    

    I don’t know about that, because if he won one in Miami or Chicago, it’s not like he just latched on ala GP/Mailman in LA. I don’t know that history looks back and makes a firm distinction between being the main guy and being the sidekick, as long as you’re playing a big role…if that’s the case, why not take the destination with a greater shot at winning?

  • rahat huq

    Randy: Unfortunately none of those free agents (bosh, lebron, etc) listed Houston in their dream-list. Lebron I can understand, but i don’t get why bosh wouldn’t consider it. Houston is the exact definition of his heroic need, “we’re going to win a championship, and you’re going to take us there”.    

    I don’t know about that, because if he won one in Miami or Chicago, it’s not like he just latched on ala GP/Mailman in LA. I don’t know that history looks back and makes a firm distinction between being the main guy and being the sidekick, as long as you’re playing a big role…if that’s the case, why not take the destination with a greater shot at winning?

  • Stephen

    The problem for Cleveland is it doesn’t matter what they want.
    They have to decide if they want to get nothing or whatever crumbs they can from whoever LeBron picks.

    I question how much more NY can mean to LeBron as far as endorsements,etc go. Yes,he can get some fat local deals,but what about Nationally.
    I would love to see the the internal assessments by major Corp’s on LeBron’s marketability. His last series of ads have him as a puppet playing second string to Kobe,sharing an ad w/Dwight and having a funky backboard replace his head. Can you imagine Jordan being told they were going to replace his face w/a backboard? I wonder if he’s pretty maxed out in the US.

  • Stephen

    The problem for Cleveland is it doesn’t matter what they want.
    They have to decide if they want to get nothing or whatever crumbs they can from whoever LeBron picks.

    I question how much more NY can mean to LeBron as far as endorsements,etc go. Yes,he can get some fat local deals,but what about Nationally.
    I would love to see the the internal assessments by major Corp’s on LeBron’s marketability. His last series of ads have him as a puppet playing second string to Kobe,sharing an ad w/Dwight and having a funky backboard replace his head. Can you imagine Jordan being told they were going to replace his face w/a backboard? I wonder if he’s pretty maxed out in the US.

  • rahat huq

    Stephen:I question how much more NY can mean to LeBron as far as endorsements,etc go. Yes,he can get some fat local deals,but what about Nationally.
        

    I don’t see him landing much more from being in New York. He already has deals with all of the major sponsors (Nike etc.) There isn’t really much difference in today’s age.

    I think, the appeal of New York is more symbolic rather than actual hard pecuniary value. It’s f**king New York. If you win there, you become God.

  • rahat huq

    Stephen:I question how much more NY can mean to LeBron as far as endorsements,etc go. Yes,he can get some fat local deals,but what about Nationally.
        

    I don’t see him landing much more from being in New York. He already has deals with all of the major sponsors (Nike etc.) There isn’t really much difference in today’s age.

    I think, the appeal of New York is more symbolic rather than actual hard pecuniary value. It’s f**king New York. If you win there, you become God.

  • DiscusThrown

    Thanks for the great interview.

    Reading about Patterson’s experience playing with Cousins and Wall makes me think he could be a great PF for our starting lineup. It sounds like he’s basically learned how to play with Yao and Brooks already.

    He doesn’t need the ball in his hand to be effective. He can both run the fast break and play a half-court game, which is important for Adelman’s two-pronged offense. He already has the foundation for a consistent jump shot needed when Yao gets doubled. He’s apparently a great team player, both offensively and defensively.

    If he lives up to his potential and doesn’t defer too much, he could be an ideal fit for the Rockets.

  • DiscusThrown

    Thanks for the great interview.

    Reading about Patterson’s experience playing with Cousins and Wall makes me think he could be a great PF for our starting lineup. It sounds like he’s basically learned how to play with Yao and Brooks already.

    He doesn’t need the ball in his hand to be effective. He can both run the fast break and play a half-court game, which is important for Adelman’s two-pronged offense. He already has the foundation for a consistent jump shot needed when Yao gets doubled. He’s apparently a great team player, both offensively and defensively.

    If he lives up to his potential and doesn’t defer too much, he could be an ideal fit for the Rockets.

  • Jared

    At least we know his left hand can’t be worst than Trevor Ariza’s. I am a big Ariza fan but, my JV basketball coach is always telling me how important it is to develop my left hand if I want to be really good on the team. And I always hear about it on TV too, but the truth is, you don’t need to have a solid weak-hand because Ariza plays 20 mpg in the NBA and his left hand STINKs. (Also, Lamar Odom has no right hand) So, what’s the deal with that?

  • Jared

    At least we know his left hand can’t be worst than Trevor Ariza’s. I am a big Ariza fan but, my JV basketball coach is always telling me how important it is to develop my left hand if I want to be really good on the team. And I always hear about it on TV too, but the truth is, you don’t need to have a solid weak-hand because Ariza plays 20 mpg in the NBA and his left hand STINKs. (Also, Lamar Odom has no right hand) So, what’s the deal with that?

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