Food for Thought

I dug up some interesting nuggets, via hoopsstats.com:

  • Opposing point guards are shooting 45% against the Rockets, good for 26th in the league.
  • Opposing shooting guards are shooting 44% against us, good for 19th.
  • Opposing small forwards are shooting 47% against the Rockets, good for near-last at 28th in the league.
  • Opposing power forwards are shooting 50% against the Rockets, good for 25th in the league.
  • Opposing centers are shooting 52% against the Rockets, good for 20th in the league.

Frightening numbers.

EDIT: Thanks to a reader for pointing out that the numbers above are actually for the 2009-2010 season.  Here are this season’s numbers.  The difference in the small forward and power forward numbers stand out immediately.

  • Opposing point guards are shooting 46% against the Rockets, good for 26th in the league.
  • Opposing shooting guards are shooting 45% against us, good for 18th.
  • Opposing small forwards are shooting 43% against the Rockets, good for 10th in the league.
  • Opposing power forwards are shooting 47% against the Rockets, good for 9th in the league.
  • Opposing centers are shooting 52% against the Rockets, good for 20th in the league.






About the author: Rahat Huq is a lawyer in real life and the founder and editor-in-chief of Red94.net.

in musings
  • Anonymous

    So we have put up with the barely dleague standard offense of hayes for his brilliance on defense, this team has no defensive commitment or identity, really don’t get why the intangibles and supposed D of Hayes and battier get them their court time

  • Guest

    The numbers you quoted don’t seem to be entirely correct as some seem to be 2009-2010 season’s numbers. Please double check.

  • Guest

    The numbers you quoted don’t seem to be entirely correct as some seem to be 2009-2010 season’s numbers. Please double check.

  • Anonymous

    You’re right – my apologies. Correcting now.

  • Guest

    Thanks for the quick response and update. I actually did some analysis based on the numbers from the same website you quoted and my findings as follows:

    The team actually performed better defensively statistically wise this season than last season! 46.2% allowed this season (ranked 18th) vs 47.6% allowed last season (rank 23th)
    Shocker!!

    If you breakdown the numbers via backcourt and frontcourt.
    The backcourt is worse ranking 27 in FG% allowed while the front court improved greatly in ranking to 12th with the team overall at 18th.

  • Stephen

    Check out the starters vs bench defensive stats for this yr.
    Starters .476 #16
    Bench .430 #13

    Small sample size,but striking overall:
    Rockets all games Backcourt on offense shooting %,#22,.421
    Rockets last 10 games Backcourt on offense shooting %,#14,.439
    Backcourt on D,all season,#27,.454
    Backcourt on D,last 10,#15,.437
    Frontcourt on offense,all season,#12,.476
    Frontcourt last 10 games,#14,.476
    Frontcourt on D,all season,#12,.466
    Frontcourt on D,last 10 games,#22,.485

    Looks like the Rockets have gotten their backcourt sorted out,but the frontcourt has started to collapse.
    If one wanted to jump to conclusions-heh-then one could say that Yao does make a big difference on both ends of the court and Martin/Brooks is a disaster when paired together.

  • Stephen

    Should have read the stats I picked better :) Yao seems to have more of an impact on defensive stats than offensive ones.

  • Blake

    Just a couple of quick stats I calculated and thought others might be interested in:

    In percentage of assisted field goals allowed, Houston ranks second in the league with 49.9%. The last-place team allowed 63.7%. If opponents are having to create their own shot, they will, in theory, shoot lower percentages. This stat surprised me.

    The Rockets draw more personal fouls than any other team per 48 minute period than any other team, 24.29 PF/48. This puts the Rockets in the bonus at an average of every quarter. Morey has stated that the Rockets believe being in the bonus is beneficial, at least when Yao plays. Of course it would be advantageous other times, especially with great free-throw shooting Martin and Scola.

    The Rockets allow .318 FTA/FGA, ranked 18th overall. The first place team allows .246, last place .395. I prefer to rank FTA/FGA rather than FTM/FGA, because a team can’t defend a free throw attempt.

    In percentage of opponent’s shots taken as 3-point attempts, the Rockets rank 5th with 19.0%. The last ranked team allow 25.9% 3-point attempts. The Rockets do close out on 3-point shooters an awful lot.

  • JCDeucer

    Does the ranking in the league mean we’re that ranking ( as in good) or that opposing positions are shooting that ranking against us (ie we’re bad)? Like it says we’re 9th in the league, is that mean we’re 9th in the league in defense, or opposing power forwards are 9th in the league at beating us offensively? Can you clarify some numbers, not everyone is an expert. Thank you.

  • Stephen

    Blake,
    Perhaps opponents feel they can drive at will on the Rockets,leading both to lower assisted % and low percentage of 3pt shots taken of total. Maybe a reflection of the #25 ranking in shot-blocking(and posed in an earlier article)?
    BTW,if the Rockets are closing out,they’re not very effective as opponents are shooting .391 on 3pt shots,good for #28.
    Again the defensive numbers look better for last 10 games than all 14.

  • Shaunwsherman

    I would be interested in seeing this terms of TS% because we are giving up a lot of 3s this year. I bet that would make our backcourt look worse. We also foul too much, which would probably make our frontcourt look worse also.

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